Read ✓ The Big Sleep (Philip Marlowe, #1) By Raymond Chandler – Pv1.info

Read ✓ The Big Sleep (Philip Marlowe, #1)  By Raymond Chandler – Pv1.info Down These Mean Streets A Man Must Go Who Is Not Himself Mean, Who Is Neither Tarnished Nor Afraid.He Is The Hero He Is Everything He Must Be A Complete Man And A Common Man And Yet An Unusual Man This Is The Code Of The Private Eye As Defined By Raymond Chandler In His 1944 Essay The Simple Act Of Murder Such A Man Was Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, An Educated, Heroic, Streetwise, Rugged Individualist And The Hero Of Chandler S First Novel, The Big Sleep This Work Established Chandler As The Master Of The Hard Boiled Detective Novel, And His Articulate And Literary Style Of Writing Won Him A Large Audience, Which Ranged From The Man In The Street To The Most Sophisticated Intellectual Marlowe Subsequently Appeared In A Series Of Extremely Popular Novels, Among Them The Lady In The Lake, The Long Goodbye, And Farewell, My Lovely Elizabeth Diefendorf, Editor, The New York Public Library S Books Of The Century, P 112.Selected As One Of Time Magazine S All Time 100 Novels, With The Following Review I Was Neat, Clean, Shaved And Sober, And I Didn T Care Who Knew It I Was Everything The Well Dressed Private Detective Ought To Be This Sentence, From The First Paragraph Of The Big Sleep, Marks The Last Time You Can Be Fully Confident That You Know What S Going On The First Novel By Raymond Chandler At The Age Of 51. Okay, so it wasn t bad There s lots of fistfights and shooting and dames, and our detective hero is appropriately jaded and tight lipped The bad guys are crazy, the women are freaks in both the streets and the sheets, and there s a subplot involving a pornography racket Everyone talks in 30 s tastic slang and usually the reader has no idea what everyone keeps yelling about It s a violent, fast paced, garter snapping the Depression equivalent of bodice ripping, I imagine detective thriller, Okay, so it wasn t bad There s lots of fistfights and shoo She was the first thing I saw when I walked into the bookstore Such a looker I damn near tripped over a stack of calf high hardbacks set next to a stand of morning papers I m sorry, she said We re not quite open yet That s okay, I told her Neither are my eyes I could tell right away I wasn t going to win any hosannas by being a smart aleck I need a book, I continued by way of apology Something fun but dark I m looking at five hundred miles today, but I m not in the mood for She was the first thing I saw when I walked into the bookstore Such a looker I damn near tripped over a stack of calf high hardbacks set next to a stand of morning papers I m sorry, she said We re not quite open yet That s okay, I told her Neither are my eyes I could tell right away I wasn t going to win any hosannas by being a smart aleck I need a book, I continued by way of apology Something fun but dark I m looking at five hundred miles today, but I m not in the mood for an epic Noir, maybe It takes a lot of plot to get through Tennessee She went to the shelves and started looking at the books I was looking at her looking at the books I m pretty sure I had the better view Try this She handed me a trade paper nothing flashy Minimalist even But I recognized it, and the title went down like a good steak You ever read it before The Big Sleep Sur It is always a pleasure to revisit a good book and find it even better than you remember But it is humbling to discover that what you once thought was its most obvious defect is instead one of its great strengths That was my recent experience with Raymond Chandler s The Big Sleep.I had read it twice before once twenty years, once forty years ago and have admired it ever since for its striking metaphors, vivid scenes, and tough dialogue Above all, I love it for its hero, Philip Marlowe, the cl It is always a pleasure to revisit a good book and find it even better than you remember But it is humbling to discover that what you once thought was its most obvious defect is instead one of its great strengths That was my recent experience with Raymond Chandler s The Big Slee A killing reading PAINT IT BLACK A nice state of affairs when a man has to indulge his vices by proxy That was the line that hook me when I watched the classic film adaptation, the one produced in 1946, starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.While I loved the whole movie, that scene between Marlowe Bogart and the character of General Sternwood Charles Waldron at the glasshouse in the beginning of the story was what hooked me It s a wonderful dialogue, full of vices, smoking and d A killing reading PAINT IT BLACK A nice state of affair

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